14 Simple Ways to Stop Eating Lots of Sugar

Fat-free-quote

Good read cleared up a bit for me and am going to start eating more fruit thought that you couldnt eat much with Diabetes but you can eat fresh fruit as the fiber in fresh fruit helps the absorption. Heading to Morrisons this week to fill up my fridge with fresh fruit!

Also low-fat foods often contain more sugar and calories than full-fat versions. It is often better to choose full-fat versions when you’re trying to reduce your sugar intake. But check on the labels first as this is not always the case. Sometimes in order to make this food low fat they can add a lot of unhealthy additives. To read more about this see the link below  ….fat-content-salt-and-sugar

Eating lots of sugar is a surefire way to raise your risk of many different diseases. This article provides several useful tricks to reduce your intake.

Source: 14 Simple Ways to Stop Eating Lots of Sugar

WHEN ONE DOOR CLOSES – Could a better one open?

download
dalai-lama-stroke-luck-wonderful-4f7hMY DAD was always one who had a saying for everything, be it good or bad, but mostly when negative things were whizzing around in your life. A couple of his favourites were  ‘nothing worth having comes easy’ and when you were expecting something good to be coming your way, ‘don’t count your chickens before they hatch’! My Dad was the eternal philosopher, verging on the pessimist, who had been brought up in the war and had been subjected to a very hard life. His father had been a coal man and was so soft with his customers, collecting payments, that he ended up going out of business. My Dad was one of four boys and his father ruled the house with a rather large and well used rod of iron. His father had suffered some injury to his hip and walked with a limp, which was quite painful at times and this caused him to have a very bad temper. My Dad was therefore quite strict with me and he often said to me, when I felt the task in front of me was too huge and almost impossible to achieve, ‘there is no such word as can’t’. Other favorites he would bestow on me when I was walking around the house with a long face, after those chickens hadn’t hatched after all were, ‘when one door closes, another one opens’ or ‘everything happens for a reason’ and ‘every cloud has a silver lining’. I must admit that as a teenager these sayings did not really help me a lot. And, looking back to when my children were teenagers, I don’t think they would have helped them much either. I would have sucessfully wound them up as they say nowadays.

there-is-always-something-to-be-thankful-for

My Dad is dead now and he died before I got the diagnosis of COPD/Emphysema/Chronic Asthma and I was sat wondering today what saying my dad would have fixed to this illogical illness and my life now. He was a great fan of Star Trek and would have associated my fate with that of Leonard Nimoy I am sure of that. I am sure also he would have thought of something, two favourites come to mind, ‘you’re never given more than you can manage’ and ‘there’s always someone worse off than you’. I certainly do not feel like that when I am in the midst of one of those horrible exacerbations that a lot of you are familiar with, maybe some of you have heard about and some of you perhaps have seen a family member or close friend struggle with. It’s not a very pleasant experience feeling like you are suffocating to death and there is very little that can be done, except taking antibiotics and/or steroids, its just a waiting game really, waiting for the symptoms to subside. It’s annoying really because they come on so suddenly and yet seem to take forever to go, another saying comes to mind, ‘patience is a virtue that very few possess’ and ‘you have to take the rough with the smooth’. Oh yes, he had a saying for everything, my Dad!

when_one_door_closes_another_opens-222091

Today I have been in an excitable and then reflective mood because I have received my appointment for my consultation at the Royal Brompton Hospital with Dr Samuel Kemp. They are at the top of the tree in alternative ways to help people with COPD and the most experienced in the UK in using the endobronchial valves. It’s a long way to go at 190 miles away but if they can help it will definitely be worth it. How life can change it was only a few weeks ago I was sat crying feeling hopeless because the consultant at Jimmy’s wasn’t on the same page as me. He wanted me to get worse before he helped, they were probably running out of funds!  Another great saying my Dad would have definitely used tonight and that would be ‘when one door closes another one opens’ , yes Dad, I can still hear you!

I have learnt a lot of things during my journey up to today and that is your health is yourRely-Quotes-Achieve-success-on-your-own-If-you-want-success-then-dont-rely-on-other-people-to-do-what-you-can-do responsibility it is up to you to question and find alternative paths to go down.Well what is that saying ‘if you want something doing do it yourself’ and I definitely wouldn’t be where I am today if it hadn’t been for the wise teachings of my Dad giving me the ability to stand on my own two feet and question everything. I am now trying to be optimistic that these doctors will be able to help remove the trapped air from my lungs so that I can breath better than I am doing at the moment, I will then have a better quality of life, I hope!

21591cb3bf11c15a1b8bd340fb8ea44fHowever. my 27 year old daughter has been throwing about the sayings these past weeks. Because, she said, I don’t want you to get disappointed if you can’t have the valves done. HELP! she’s turning into her Grandad!! But, I suppose that’s not a bad thing, he was a wonderful Father even though he was the worst pessimist going.

Lets give a thought to the people in our life that have done so much for us, our parents, family and friends –

For more on this story see Falling off the precipice – and my appointment at the Royal Brompton

images (1)

Endobronchial Valves – Links and Things

I feel like I’m like a bird that has had its wings clipped, being held up at every turn! It can be very frustrating.

I have only been writing this blog now for 7 months but in that time I have learnt loads and passed this information on to my readers as often as possible. One thing that I haveimg_6765 been asked about more than anything by people from the US and UK are about the endobronchial valves. I have done a number of posts on them so I felt they deserved a chapter of their own so I will be putting all the links on this post together for them. My road to having these valves fitted has not been an easy one and in the post My 2nd Appointment to Jimmy’s  you will see why. You have to jump through a lot of hoops to finally get there and also my opinion on where and who they would be fitted by has also been under a lot of change. Hey, this is an important operation, if I am to be put under general anesthetic and have my lungs tampered with, I want the best tamperer!

THOSE HOOPS AND HURDLES!

One of the first hoops you have to get through is all the tests and because I have the worst luck in the world at always having appointments when I am suffering from a bad images (4)day, this has been a real pain to say the least. The first test I had was the full lung function test and it took quite a long time and because I was in the middle of an exacerbation this was not very pleasant but I was determined to finish it, it’s one step nearer!  I was so exhausted after the test for the first time ever, I had to get a porter to push me back to the car. Then you must have a CT Scan that is easy even if you are under par. However, since I have started exercising I am no longer having these problems, it has been hard trying to fit exercise in between flare ups during winter but it’s just a matter of how determined you are to feel a bit less breathless in the long-term.

After all these results were through, I had to wait to see my specialist at Huddersfield more time wasted! When I had chatted to her about the procedure and she asked me if I was sure that I wanted it done as I could live for years like this and I wasn’t going to die. I said, ‘exactly, this is why I want it done I don’t want to live like this for years!’. She then referred  me to Leeds, Jimmy’s in fact and my first appointment there was very good. I saw a young thoracic surgeon who was very hopeful of a good outcome and booked me in for a nuclear scan. Details of this can be read up in another section called My Appointment at Jimmy’s for Nuclear Scan . It seems that if there are any tears in between the lobes of your lungs, then it’s difficult to do the operation. A nuclear scan shows them this apparently. Its called  ‘collateral ventilation’ and there is a post about this in the link Collateral Ventilation Explained Simply!!

While this was all going on, I was waiting for my referral for the other hurdle that had to be endured before I could have the operation done and that was the Pulmonary Rehab Course. Actually, I was quite looking forward to completing this course. I had tried twice in the past and only got through the first month or so because I caught and infection and did not want to give it to everyone else so I carried on doing a bit at home. I did a full course at our local hospice but it wasn’t much in the way of exercises. It was more chat, tea and coffee and cake and education about the disease which ended with a living will lesson, which didn’t go down with me very well at all, I felt like walking out! I am definitely not ready for that yet. Anyway, I did try to start the Pulmonary Rehab Course but when I went for my assessment true to me I was having another flare up and she wouldn’t continue with the 6 min walk because my stats had dropped dramatically from walking about 6 foot to the corridor. She asked me to ring her when I had recovered.

THERE IS ALWAYS LIGHT AT THE END OF THE TUNNEL!

866563ec8c9a2c61ede792f4da9c86e1

I can promise you that it is not an easy road trying to improve your breathing and your situation when you have COPD. From what I have been able to discover the first person in the UK to have the valves fitted was in 2012, so it’s still early days. There are other methods also such as coils, surgery etc.  It is costing the NHS millions in support treatments at the moment and palliative care and the numbers of lung patients are rising, add-on to that the number of people with heart disease as it’s a crossover, if you get my meaning; it is costing a mint. Therefore, I feel a lot more research will be done during the next 10 years, they might even find a cure. you never know. Anyway after a terrible time at my last appointment at Jimmy’s, I actually had some good news and you can read about it in the following post NEVER LOSE FAITH – It must be Karma! and Amen to that!

Below are all the links about the valves –

IS COPD TERMINAL – AM I GOING TO DIE?

images (3)During one of my hospitalisations with my Asthma the news was broken to me that I could have developed COPD (this was confirmed at a much later date), I will NEVER forget the feeling, when they handed me a leaflet on Emphysema and COPD and just left me to deal with the news alone. I spent all night in the bathroom looking out of the window and crying. I just couldn’t handle it at that time. I said ‘will I die from this?’ and the nurse said, ‘we all have to die of something’, that definitely wasn’t what I wanted to hear at that time.

My Grandad had died of emphysema, I hadn’t been very close to him unfortunately so did not know what he went through with it or how he managed it but I knew it was terrible, whatever it was and I was basically frightened of the unknown.
The truth is, how long you live once you have been diagnosed is up to you. Your life and how long you survive once diagnosed is literally in your own hands. How long you survive will depend on your actions because although COPD is progressive that progress, providing you do not smoke, is very slow. 
 
The following piece has been written by Derek Cummings who has lived with the disease for 28 years and I really wish I could have read this when I was told I MIGHT have it.  The way you react when first told you have this illness needs to be positive, you need to know that you are not going to die and how you can make your life better, also what you can do to improve your life and slow the disease down – I so wish I had known this. I was like many people at first, I just felt that this was it the end of my life, what was the point of doing anything, I was depressed basically and scared! Below is this piece and some links have been kept in for your further reading.

knowledge_is_power_by_haleyspeers-d4nqjj7As someone who has written a journal on my journey with COPD for several years I often receive emails from frightened readers. Or notice a search engine query asking if COPD is a death sentence or how long do I have to live with COPD? “Will I live long enough to see my children grow up? Does this mean I will not see my daughter grow up, get married, start her own family? Or ever know my future grandchildren?” are often the first questions I read in emails I receive.

Many times this is followed by a Google session as the frightened patient types “how long do I have to live with COPD?”. To then receive some good, but sometimes frightening advice. One page I know informs the reader you will live five years at most from diagnosis. How wrong is that? I have suffered COPD for 28 years now. I have friends on my COPD network that have lived with this illness for longer than I. If that advice had been right, I would have been dust by 1992.

None of us will beat the reaper. We are all sadly going to die at some time in the future. But more than likely with COPD and not because of it, despite COPD being one of the major causes of death in both the USA and UK. I am not going to lie, COPD will finish some of us. But most will have managed their condition for very many years, with lots of fun-packed times put in before the inevitable happens.

The truth is how long you live once you have been diagnosed is up to you. Your life and how long you survive once diagnosed is literally in your own hands. How long you survive will depend on your actions because although COPD is progressive that progress, providing you do not smoke, is very slow. Just simple lifestyle changes can and will add years to your life. As your illness progresses through the stages there is no denying there will be many challenges, and if you reach stage 4, there might come a time when you need to use oxygen therapy. But the truth is you are much more likely to die of something other than COPD.

Terminal to me is having cancer and being told you have weeks or months to live. That is the time to do all the things you have been scared to do. A parachute or bungee jump for instance. Can you imagine me jumping out a plane with an 8 pounds oxygen cylinder on my back? I guess my jump will speed up a bit but have to admit to laughing when I think about it. Our job with COPD is to make sure the reaper waits as long as possible. To do that, all you need to do is manage your condition. Take your medications when you need them. Oxygen if prescribed. Do not smoke. Else you might not last five years. Quitting smoking slows the pace of COPD dramatically. Exercise as much as you are able. This will exercise the lungs and help to keep muscles toned. Muscle uses least oxygen. Try not to get stressed as stress causes lots of breathing problems. Try to stay positive and to keep positive people around you. Have ‘It’s good to laugh’, as your motto and laugh often. Ask your consultant for a COPD management plan and stick to it. Make sure you get a flu shot each year and pneumonia shot. If you become unusually breathless seek medical attention as soon as you can. If you do that, like me, you can live for very many years. In two years I have an anniversary. It will then be 30 years I will have lived with COPD – yet despite stage four I am still enjoying life.

Two years ago I learned of the death of a 66-year-old man from COPD. It was with sadness I read the reason. Despite having been prescribed oxygen, a false pride meant he would not use it. To him it was seen as a weakness to be seen using oxygen. Sadly his heart gave out under the strain of trying to give his body theoxygen he needed, and he died.

If you are prescribed oxygen it is to protect your vital organs including your heart. Oxygen when needed helps us to feel well and to breathe easier. I use oxygen for mobility and have no such false pride. Sometimes people look but everyone is polite and helpful. During the three years I have used oxygen not one has been rude. It is equally sad that many that do have mobile oxygen do not venture out their homes, in fear of what others might say. My thoughts have always been if someone has a problem with my cannula that is their problem. Not mine.

I hope this short piece has helped allay some of your fears of COPD, leaving you more able to start to feel less stressed and more able to move forward. Till I write again, keep that smile. But most of all, Breathe Easy.

I was diagnosed with mild COPD in 1987 when 39 years of age. Now at the very severe stage, I use oxygen for mobility and am disabled by my illness. Despite this I still have an extremely active life, and after more than 27 years of living with bad lungs, am living proof that we with COPD can enjoy a long life. I am often seen at events, meetings, restaurants, and publicity events though I wear a ‘nose hose’ for oxygen when mobile and a mobility scooter to get around.

See Also  How long will I live Another Wonderful Piece

The 10-Step Programe – does it work?

Ten Steps – Ten Weeks

I bought this book after seeing a very small review of it on another blog and it has been well worth the money I paid for it. It can be bought through Ebay for around £11.

download

The author states –

The COPD Solution is a comprehensive, 10 step program for managing life with chronic lung disease. It bridges the gap between merely surviving, or just getting through each day and completely thriving. its about treating, educating and implementing life saving modifications for anyone suffering with COPD. Dawn also says, that when you hear the rest of Linda’s story you will cry tears of your own and maybe, for the first time you will feel hope for yourself or your loved one.

images (14)The first thing I will do before starting any of the program is the 6 min walk test and I will post the results in the section Exercising and COPD, it gives you a base measurement to go by. I will try to do a video as well so when I have finished the course I can compare videos with progress that I have made. I will measure a 75 feet circle or length in my room (as described in the book) and walk as far as I can do without stopping and at the end of the 6 mins measure how far I have actually managed to walk in the 6 mins taking the stops into account. Its very similar to the way I have been doing my cycling which I started at the beginning of January. I did 15 mins cycling. At first it took me about 30 mins to do 15 mins cycling I was so breathless and just before I had to stop because I was ill, I was managing 15 mins in less than 20 mins.So I was slowly improving.

The book covers food that makes it more difficult to breath, so you will be taught what and what not to eat. How to become stronger, you will learn about your oxygen and about using energy. You will learn about your muscles and how your body uses oxygen and how to properly breath, how you got this disease and what has happened inside your lungs so you can better understand what your struggle is and how to cough the right way to bring up the mucus and how to take your meds properly so they will be more effective.

Dawn Fielding explained to Linda that by carrying out her program she would expect her to dramatically improve on her present performance. Lets see if I do! I need my breath for singing. After reading this book would I recommend it? Yes I would indeed it was worth every penny, they should give it out on the NHS! The following is a run down on the books’ contents, what are you getting for your money?

profile-divider-16

The appendix

At the rear of the book you will find a lot of trackers and organisers  that you can photocopy and fill in to help you organise certain aspects of your COPD. A good idea if you like writing things down.

Step One – Coming to Terms with COPD

Step one of the 10-week plan is Making Peace with COPD, I have mentioned this myself at length in the section Coming to Terms with Your Diagnosis. Before I could move forward and make any sense of this illness I had to come to terms with what I had, how bad it was and really look the dragon in the face. Many different emotions are felt at this point the main one is grief, the loss of something but you are not alone these feelings are common among many people with life changing illnesses. What helped me was reaching out for help, meeting people who were in the same boat as myself, joining support groups etc. The author explains this step very well and talks about fear, depression and anxiety also. Well, it looks like I have worked through this step without any help from the book already, so I can move on to the next step.

Step Two – Oxygen Therapy

Step two is oxygen therapy. In the USA a lot of people are on oxygen therapy, they use it a great deal more than we do in Great Britain, we do get given it eventually but our specialists tend to wait and see if you pick up on your own after pulmonary rehab. As long as your 02 stats are above 90 or so when resting they are happy. You can get dependent on oxygen, when I am in hospital and recovering from a bad chest infection I need some supplemental oxygen and its surprising how quickly you become dependent on it. They then wean me off it as soon as they can and usually when I go home my oxygen sats are at 94 and rise to 97 after a short time. However, when oxygen is really needed it is vital to use it because your main organs can be affected by lack of oxygen, such as your heart! It’s a very good section that she has written on oxygen and covers all the delivery methods and sleep apnea also.

Step Three – The 3p’s Patience, Pacing and Persistence your 3 Best Friends

Downward-spiralThe next step is about breathing exercises and ways to breath to help you recover quicker. Its a great chapter. She starts by explaining that your stress levels directly impact your lung disease and your ability to breath. This is called the cycle of dyspnea, referred to as the COPD Downward Spiral. When you struggle to breath, your stress levels naturally increase, which makes it more difficult to breath and repeat, repeat, if you get the jist of it. She explains controlled breathing techniques which I do at times and I have done a section on some of this already. Controlled breathing actually releases endorphins in your body, dilating blood vessels and increasing blood supply to the tissues, lowering, heart rate and blood pressure. Controlled breathing is pursed lip breathing which I use a lot, belly breathing (diaphragmatic breathing) and positioning. The belly breathing is practiced during singing so that is why singing is so good for you. Its the only way I can do the diaphragmatic breathing properly. You need to practice these things on a daily basis. These are some sections on my blog that cover breathing …. Breathing, Breathing  and Exercise, Breathing 4. I practice these different types of breathing all the time, my sons always complaining, ‘do you have to make that noise’, I just ignore him and get on with it.

Step Four – Conserve your Energyimages (11)

I have covered this already on my blog a number of times and it is important to pace yourself and it is also important to relax and meditate. The following links have all got within them ideas for conserving your energy and getting the most out of each day –

Making the most of every day
COPD, how to claw some  of your life back
If you want the rainbow you have to put up with the rain
The spoon theory

The author of the book has some great ideas and advice so it’s well worth reading this section.

Step Five – Prevent Flare-Ups: Use Your Meds Effectively

This is another useful chapter, it is very important to use your meds effectively. It is very complex and there are so many medications that I really do not cover this on my blog because I am not a medical person. I learnt a few things when I read this chapter one was the existence of another medication that I knew nothing about. However, it doesn’t come without a number of possible side effects. It is called Daliresp and this is the brand name for the prescription drug, roflumilast, which is a phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor used in cases of severe COPD to reduce the number of exacerbations.

Dawn also explains about the importance of having peak flow readings daily. I know this is important for spotting when an exacerbation is on its way but I hate doing these peak flows. At the rear of the book you will find an appendix which contains lots of different forms for you to use especially tracking charts. These can be photocopied and used to help you plot your peak flow readings. There are a lot of forms which are referred to in this chapter such as your COPD Action Plan and I am sure that I will use a lot of these forms.

Step Six – Pulmonary Rehab

Pulmonary Rehab is described as the key to the COPD solution

The author uses inspiring quotes at the start of each chapter which I like and this is the one for this particular chapter which I find very motivating –

When I loved myself enough, I began leaving whatever wasn’t healthy. This meant people, jobs, my own beliefs, and habits – anything that kept me small. My judgment called it disloyal. Now I see it as self loving. (Kim McMillen)

This chapter is very important in the book because from experience and also from many other peoples’ experience, exercise is the key to regaining a chunk of your mobility back. I like the quote because although exercise is one of the main things you can do to improve your life it is also very hard. The author states that Pulmonary Rehab is designed to  –

“support your circle of therapies, to help slow the progression of your lung disease, improve your daily life and decrease your symptoms, ask your doctor for a referral to Pulmonary Rehab…Pulmonary rehab is designed to improve your physical, emotional and psychological health.”

The Anxiety/Dyspnea Deconditioning Cycle

In plain English this means that when you are very out of breath you can become anxious and in this situation you will refrain from carrying on with whatever you were doing when this happened.  It could be perhaps just walking to the door, going downstairs for a cup of tea on an evening or maybe just hanging the washing out. When this happens and you stop doing these things you become more breathless as you are less fit. I think this can happen particularly after an exacerbation or a stay in hospital, that is why you feel that you never quite get back to your pre exacerbation state. You are mainly just out of condition due to being sat about for a couple of weeks waiting for the exacerbation to pass. That is why pulmonary rehab is so important it gets you fitter and more able to use the oxygen that you are breathing in more efficiently. Toned muscles use less oxygen.

A pulmonary rehab course covers a few things including exercise, half of the class usually has feature speakers talking about medication, lifestyle, breathing techniques and more. Physical reconditioning is very important, did you know that a 2 week exacerbation is all it takes to wipe out loads of your physical fitness? The strength and tone it took a week to gain will be lost in 2 days!  PR is also a chance to chat with other people who have the same illness as you. I will be reading this chapter over and over again because it is something I want to do but have also found very difficult.You have to realise that it is OK to get out of breath, the more exercise you do the more you will be able to do without getting so very short of breath. You can also read quite a few posts on my blog about P and exercise –

As stated previously this chapter is very important and I shall be revisiting it regularly.

Step Seven – Quit Smoking

hqdefaultI am not altogether sure that this should be step seven because of its importance with this disease and the benefits attached to stopping this habit are very high. I would have put this step as 2 or 3. In the section of my blog called ‘my stopping smoking saga‘, I explained how difficult I found this to be, you are struggling with two things really the fact that you want to quit for your health and money of course; but also I was struggling with the fact that I was going to gain weight and that is also unhealthy. Its like the devil and the deep blue sea in a way. So, I tried to minimize the weight gain as much as possible!

The addiction of nicotine and all the other chemicals that they put in cigarettes is no joke, I found the following piece very helpful to read it really explains about the addition.

Nicotine Addiction 101 – Best piece I Have Read On Nicotine Dependency!

Step Eight – Choose Foods for better breathing

tumblr_mqi7rwm8Y71rjetaio1_500Having enough food to eat of the good kind is very important as people with COPD require more nutrients and tend to be malnourished even the fat ones, like me! She explains the cycle of malnutrition very well and to be honest its not something I have thought about until now! Like everyone else you think that if you are overweight you are ok nutrition wise NOT TRUE! I think this is a great chapter and I will enjoy reading this one and researching nutrients.Apparently not getting enough vital nutrients adds to the deconditioning (loss of your overall physical fitness). I know I do not get enough of some nutrients because of my diet, I am almost vegan. Because of this it might be a good idea to take a supplement as you need to feed your muscles to keep up their strength. This is a fascinating chapter and well worth the cost of the book for this chapter alone. Another chapter that I will be visiting again.

download (1)

One interesting thing that the author points out is the subject of  Carbon Dioxide (CO2). If you consume a lot of carbonated sugary drinks, such as coke and sugary foods you can after a short while find yourself more breathless. And this has definitely happened to me but I did not know at the time why it had happened. The point is when sugars are metabolised they break down to form excess CO2. The only place that this can be done efficiently is with your breathing, you end up breathing the CO2 back to normal levels, this is a natural response for your body in this situation. This is not good for people with COPD because it puts your respiratory rate up making it harder to breath. A much better explanation of this is on page 215 of the book. Sugary foods can have the same effect so say no to sugar!

images

This section also stresses the importance of not being too overweight because unnecessary weight can make it more difficult to breath. Belly weight of which I have loads, can hinder the ability of your diaphragm to descend lessening the space your lungs have for expansion. So, I am in trouble from the top and the bottom. The top where my emphysema is and the bottom where my fat is!

Step Nine – Try Yoga

As a young woman I did a lot of Yoga and I must admit I will enjoy taking this up again on my own. There are lots of videos on YouTube that you can watch. I enjoy Yoga because it focuses more on breathing and holding various poses. It is not an aerobic type of exercise but when I first started to do Yoga when I was about 16 I can remember losing half a stone very quickly.

Step Ten – Stay Connected – Take Charge of Your Life!

09career5

It is very easy to become out of touch when your COPD progresses, I have included a piece on this in my blog, this is the link – Loneliness and Isolation. It is so easy to become housebound and there is no need. It is all about maintaining your relationships and friendships, communicating and staying connected to others. You might say this is easier said than done! But with all the equipment we have these days, phones, laptops, tablets you don’t need to leave home to have company. Staying connected with your friends can be very difficult  because many just cannot deal with their friend having this disease. I have had to make some new friends and most of my new friends have COPD themselves.

There are many groups on facebook where you can meet hundreds of people who have COPD and are in the same boat as you are. Going to church is another method of meeting people and becoming involved with your community. At the PR group you will also meet more people and have a chat over a cup of tea and biscuits. My local hospice also has a lot of different courses that they run such as pilates and art class, give yours a call and see if there is anything that would suit you.

 

oprah-quote-about-life

 

 

Rare ‘healthy’ smokers’ lungs explained | COPD News Of The Day

Man smoking

The mystery of why some people appear to have healthy lungs despite a lifetime of smoking has been explained by UK scientists.The analysis of more than 50,000 people showed favourable mutations in people’s DNA enhanced lung function and masked the deadly impact of smoking. The Medical Research Council scientists say the findings could lead to new drugs to improve lung function. But not smoking will always be the best option, they say.

Many, but not all, smokers will develop lung disease. But so too will some who have never touched a cigarette in their lives.

The researchers analysed the huge amount amount of health and genetic data from volunteers to the UK’s Biobank project.

Read more Rare ‘healthy’ smokers’ lungs explained which also includes a video of the findings.